Loose and Lose are often confused because of their pronunciation but they actually have different meanings and uses.

Loose is an adjective that means not tight or not held firmly in place. Not fitting to the body (of clothes)

For example:

  • The screws on the door are loose. (The screws on the door are not fastened securely.)
  • My pants are too loose. (The pants do not fit the subject properly.)

Lose is a verb that means to fail to keep or retain possession of something, or to be defeated or outdone.

For example:

  • I don’t want to lose my keys. (The subject does not want to misplace their keys)
  • Our team lost the game. (The team did not win their game.)

In summary, Loose is an adjective that describes something that is not tight or not held firmly in place

Lose is a verb that means to fail to keep or retain possession of something, or to be defeated or outdone.

Loose

1.) She shook her hands loose from the ropes.

2.) Check that the plug has not come loose.

3.) The door has come loose in the dining room.

4.) This tooth feels very loose.

5.) My belt is loose; I didn’t buckle it up enough.

6.) Her tight curls were now loose waves.

7.) The shirt was in my size, but it was very loose.

8.) She often wears her hair loose.

9.) One of the bricks feels slightly loose.

10.) Have you seen the scissors? I want to snip off this loose thread.

Lose

1.) You win some, you lose some.

2.) Don’t lose faith in humanity.

3.) I lose to the others but win from you.

4.) Sometimes to gain, you have to lose.

5.) One wrong move and we can lose the game.

6.) I don’t want to lose our home.

7.) I lose two hours every morning stuck in traffic. 

8.) You can’t lose what you never had.

9.) How did you lose your deal?

10.) People don’t appreciate the blessing of health till they lose it.

By Karen

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